Her mom will be ok.

Her mom will be ok.

Losing the struggle to hold her reaction at bay, tears began as the tiny child saw her mother collapse and admitted to hospital. It was late in the day. She was frightened and hungry. As I held, comforted, and fed her, I was not only feeling grateful for the excellent care at Chambishi Clinic but also for all of you who make it possible for me to continue into 2012, assisting the people in Mbayi as they struggle to survive abject poverty.It was malaria, back in full force with the rains. In the months to come I’ll be bringing meds into the village and more patients to the clinic. By 2013, if all goes well, we will have our own Health Post in Mbayi, people will be treated for malaria ( and other problems ) earlier and extreme cases like this one will be unusual occurrences.

Earlier that same day I was in Kitwe with Paulinah at the Eye Clinic. You may remember that surgery to save her eye was unsuccessful and it was eventually removed. Now the remaining one is in danger of losing sight and we’re hoping that an injection, $2,000.00 in America, I’m told,  but $70.00 here may help. Procedure is set for the end of the month. How would she manage without us ( you and I ) I wonder?

While in Kitwe I also stopped in at the market to purchase some dried fish for a group of seniors who require food relief weekly and couldn’t help but imagine the impact our proposed fish farming will make. Once the rainy season ends, the fish pond can be prepared.

We are making a huge difference in Mbayi day to day and offering hope for the future. I want to say thank you and well done friends to Hands of Hope ( as we are known here ). May you be abundantly blessed throughout 2012.

Paulinah (in her new Canadian sweater).

Paulinah (in her new Canadian sweater).